The Eclipse - Schools

WARNING
DO NOT LOOK DIRECTLY AT THE SUN WITHOUT PROPER EYE PROTECTION
DO NOT LOOK AT THE SUN THROUGH BINOCULARS, TELESCOPE OR CAMERA
DO NOT "STARE" (LOOK FOR MORE THAN A FEW SECONDS) AT THE SUN

by Claire Flanagan (claire@astroclaire.co.za / www.moonshadowmix.co.za).
A 2.5min video on safe viewing of the eclipse is available on YouTube.
The UK CLEAPSS guide on "Managing pupils safety during an eclipse" is here.

Eclipse Safety Issues

Be aware that: So:
TreesUneclipsedCroppedScaledA (44K) These "natural" pinhole-projected images of the Sun, seen under most trees, will easily and safely show the eclipsed Sun on eclipse day.
eclipseshirt_fishley_c600ScaledA (18K) You can safely photograph the pinhole-projected image of the Sun.
Photo: Simon Fishley, Cape Town.


Preparing for eclipse day

FizzpopTennisBallAnnotatedA (14K) A "fizzpop" (Moon) and a tennis ball (Earth), held 2m apart, demonstrate nicely how, when the Moon passes between the Sun and the Earth, the Moon blocks the Sun from view for the people in its shadow - aim to get the shadow moving across the tennis ball.
PinholesDifferentShapesHolesAndPaperScaledA (17K) Experiment with pinhole projection - different shapes and sizes of holes.


Sharing eclipse-viewers

Watch2013Caa (19K) Eclipse-viewers are the safest . . .
SharingViewers02Aa (13K) Share viewers but don't fight over them!.


For tips on safe viewing (and alternatives to eclipse-viewers), go here.

Viewers can be shared. To plan for this:
For example:
A school in Rustenburg (South Africa) has 26 classes of about 30 learners per class.
The eclipse-calculator tells them:
Eclipse2016SepRustenburgAa (16K)
They decide to aim for eclipse-viewing from 10am to 12noon - two hours. There is a half-hour break at 11am, so viewing time is reduced to one-and-a-half hours.
They decide to get one eclipse-viewer per three learners - ten for a class of 30. So if one or two get damaged (from learners fighting over them), it's not a disaster.
They consider the following options:
The teachers decide they would like the learners to spend enough time outside to make and photograph pinhole projection art, but that they don't want to spend too much money on viewers, so they decide to:

Education Resources


Please let us know of more.


Aphakia is "the absence of the lens of the eye, due to surgical removal, a perforating wound or ulcer, or congenital anomaly. It causes a loss of accommodation, far sightedness . . ." [Wikipedia].


Questions and comments can be sent to Claire Flanagan.